About Border Interfaith

Border Interfaith is a broad-based community organization located in El Paso, Texas. We are affiliated with the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the West / Southwest IAF and the Texas IAF.  We develop leadership through education and interfaith relationships to encourage democratic practices and meaningful community action.

Our members are faith and neighborhood communities who work across religious, racial, ethnic, economic, generational and neighborhood lines for the good of the whole community.  Border Interfaith's goal is to develop leadership in our member institutions.

Border Interfaith believes that in order for community leaders to be effective, we must be educated and informed citizens.  We engage in public discourse and initiate action guided by that conversation.  Active citizenship creates opportunities for ordinary people to effect real and dramatic change in the community.  We strive to hold elected officials accountable for their public responsibilities.

Teaching & Practicing Democracy

Border Interfaith embraces a vision of a vibrant bilingual border community.  We are convinced that El Paso can be a better place to live – better schools, better jobs, healthier citizens.

• We commit as institutional members to work for a community where the schools are excellent, all residents have affordable healthcare, and all people are treated with respect.

• We hold our elected officials accountable to ensure they protect our natural environment, manage growth carefully, and make basic services available to all.

• We pledge to identify and train leaders whose web of relationships transcend economic, racial, gender, and religious divisions.

Through building relational power and engaging actively in democratic civic life, our institutions and leaders will transform our border region.  Our motivation comes from the teaching of our diverse faiths and from our fervent belief in liberty and justice.


  • Latest from the blog

    Border Interfaith & EPISO Put 'We the People' Back Into Local Politics

    One day before the launch of early voting, hundreds of Border Interfaith and EPISO leaders assembled to challenge candidates for Mayor, City Council and the Board of Trustees for El Paso and Ysleta School Board around the issues most impacting residents’ daily lives. Specifically, leaders asked candidates to commit to: on-time completion of specific infrastructure projects, opposition to statewide anti-immigrant legislation, and funding for Project ARRIBA to the tune of $1.5 million over five years. City candidates were also challenged to publicly support a living wage for subcontractors who work for the city government. With the exception of one candidate, the El Paso Times reports that “nearly all the candidates answered yes on all the issues and pledged to support Border Interfaith and EPISO on their agendas.” At the conclusion of the assembly, leaders in the audience were challenged to take note of candidate responses and communicate what they heard to at least ten voters each before the final Election Day in May. [Photo Credit: David Burge / El Paso Times] Grassroots Democracy on Display During EPISO Event, El Paso Times [pdf] Future City Leaders Answer Questions About Immigration, Infrastructure, KVIA  ABC 7 [pdf] Organizaciones Religiosas se Reunen Con Candidatos Antes de las Elecciones, Entravision / Univision      
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    Border Interfaith Clergy: You Are Not Alone

    Civic academies organized by Border Interfaith are drawing upwards of 50 parishioners per session ready to learn how to use their civil rights to protect family members from deportation.  At a recent session, Rev. Pablo Matta, the pastor of St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church told parishioners “You are not alone.”  He additionally explained, “We are not asking anyone to violate the law.  We are using the laws that exist.” Organizers reminded immigrants that they have the right to remain silent, a right to an attorney and not to sign any document given to them by immigration agents without first talking to a lawyer.  They also advised family members not to open the door to US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents without a warrant. “Once they enter, many things can happen. There could be other people in the home. The immigration agents may starting asking, ‘You, what’s your name? How long have you been here?’ … They came in looking for Arturo and they took Maria, Jose, Raul and several people. So, don’t do it. Don’t do it.” [Photo Credit: Victor Calzada, El Paso Times]
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